KNOWARE  

Software for Education and Industry


   Home   Order Form    Reviews   

Getting Started with

Visual Basic.NET and SQLite

                                    

What is Visual Basic.NET?

Visual Basic.NET, also called Visual Basic Studio, is the Visual  Basic language portion of Microsoft's Visual Studio.  Visual Studio consists of a suite of programming languages including C, C++, C++/CLI, Visual Basic.NET, C#, F#, JavaScript, TypeScript, XML, XSLT, HTML, and CSS, and other languages available via plug-ins. Support for all these languages is built into one common IDE, or Integrated Development Environment program, called Visual Studio. Visual Studio is Microsoft's attempt to make one IDE in which multiple programming languages can be used to make applications for multiple platforms, such as Windows, the Internet, Xbox, Windows Phone, Linux, macOS and Android.

Visual Studio comes in four editions:
Of these editions, only the Community edition is free.  And that is the edition you will download for this tutorial.

If all this seems a bit overwhelming; fear not!  In spite of its immense capabilities, the latest edition of Visual Studio is very user friendly and this tutorial will focus only on the Visual Basic portion of Visual Studio, along with the basics of object oriented programming (OOP) and how to connect and use SQLite, a stand-alone database useful for many applications.


A Short History of BASIC:

BASIC (Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code) is a general-purpose, high-level programming language first developed in 1964Because its syntax was easier to read than many other programming languages, it quickly gained in popularity,  In 1991, Microsoft came out with Visual Basic which allowed users to create Windows programs.  That edition of Visual Basic incorporated many of the feature of an object oriented program (OOP), but lacked some features such as "inheritance".  With the introduction of Visual Basic.NET in 2001, however, Visual Basic became a full fledged OOP program with all the features of C, C#, etc.

What is SQLite?

SQLite is an embedded SQL database program that runs on your local computer, as opposed to running on a server like Microsoft SQL Server or MySQL.  Go here for a complete explanation of database programs compatible with Visual Studio.  Many programs can benefit from using an embedded database program like SQLite.  For example, my programs Group Scheduler 2.2 and Health Tracker both use SQLite to keep track of activities being scheduled or health events.


What You Will Learn in this Tutorial:
How to use this tutorial:

Read the chapters of this tutorial in the order in which they are presented because they build on one another.  The code for most chapters is included in the Examples folder of this program.  You will get the most benefit from this tutorial, however, if you type in  your own code as opposed to just viewing the examples.  In other words, learn by doing.

There is a lot of information on the Internet regarding Visual Basic .NET and SQLite, and indeed this tutorial refers you to some of those sites.  But often times explanations and examples on the Internet are cluttered with extraneous information that makes them more useful as a reference than a leaning tool. 

All examples in this tutorial are kept as simple as possible to illustrate the topic at hand (so you don't get "lost in the weeds").




Getting Started with
Visual Basic.NET and SQLite

Table of Contents


Chapter

1.   Introduction 
   
                                 
2.   Launching Visual Studio
Download Visual Studio
Install Visual Studio
Summary                         

3.  Creating Your First Program (Hello World!)
Open Visual Studio
Create a New Project
Program and Run the Project
Examine the Files
Summary                                   

4.  Deploying Your Program
Open the Hello World project
Use the Publish Project Wizard
Summary

5.  Methods (Subroutines and Functions)
Introduction
Create a New Project
Build Form1
Set the Properties
Add Two Numbers Using a Subroutine
Add Two Numbers Using a Function
Combine Two Strings Using a Subroutine
Combine Two Strings Using a Function
Summary                      

6.  Branching (If...Else, Select Case)
Introduction
Create a New Project
Build Form1
Code IF...Else Statements for Button1_Click
Code Select Case Statements for Button1_Click
Summary

7. Looping (For..Next, While, Do While)
Introduction
Create a New Project
Build Form1
Run the For...Next Example
Run the While Example
Run the Do While Example
Summary

8.  Arrays
Introduction
Create a New Project
Build Form1
Fill the ListBox from a list of variables
Fill the ListBox from an array
Add New Names to the Array at Runtime
Create a 2 Dimensional Array
Summary
         
9.  Classes
Introduction        
Create a New Project
Build Form1
Add a Class named Houses to the Project
Program the Class named Houses
Program Form1
Run the Program
Summary

10.  Stand-Alone Classes (.dll Files)
Introduction
Create a Stand-Alone Class
Program and Build the Stand-Alone Class
Create a New Project
Build Form1
Program Form1
Run the Program
Summary

11.  Inheritance       
Introduction
Create a New Project
Build Form1
Add a Class named DerivedClass to the Project
Add a Reference to the Class to be Inherited
Program the DerivedClass
Program Form1                      
Run the Program
Summary
  
12.  SQLite 
Introduction
Download and Install SQLite Studio
Build the Database
Add data to the Database
Summary 

13.  Connecting Visual Basic.Net to SQLite
Introduction
Installing the ADO.NET Data Provider
Building Form1
Connecting to the Database
Getting Data from the Database
Adding, Changing, and Deleting Data
Summary 

 

Sample excerpt from...

Chapter 3. Creating Your First Program

Step 3)  Program and Run the Project

Your screen should now look similar to Figure 5 below. The center window labeled "Form1.vb (Design)" is where we will design the form the user will see when they run the program. Notice the other windows that have been created automatically for the development of the application. If all of these windows are not displayed, click on the menu item View at the top left-hand side of the screen, then click on their name to display them.
Figure 5. Application ready to be programmed



Hardware/Software Requirements: